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Different Types of Stress | Test yours

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Know more about Types of Stress. Stress can be acute or chronic and have a dangerous impact on health leading to suicidal thoughts. learn more here! At the end of this article, a link is given where you can test your stress level manually.

Do you feel stressed? Do you realize that your nervousness is somewhat excessive lately? Are you anxious? Many of us are affected by anxiety, nervousness, and stress, in fact, a huge number of professionals suffer from work-related stress. So, what causes stress and what are the different types of stress?

What is Stress?

Stress is part of everyday life and arises just as well from pleasant or painful situations. While it can pose a serious health threat when it is too intense, there are many ways to deal with it and reduce the risks. Stress can be associated with important events (stimuli) called stressors, such as marriage or a new job, or more common, such as work pressure or vacation planning. Positive stress, the one you feel after a victory or when you go on vacation, can be motivating and raise the level of energy. But the negative effects of too much stress on a person under pressure can affect health.

Three Stages of Stress

• Mobilization of energy

The body releases adrenaline, the heart beats faster and breathing accelerates, regardless of whether the triggering event is pleasant or painful.

• Use of energy reserves

If the state of mobilization persists, the body draws energy from its reserves of sugars and fats. The person feels stressed, tired and maybe inclined to consume more coffee, tobacco or alcohol. She may become anxious, mend black, have memory loss and be more vulnerable to colds and flu.

• Exhaustion of energy reserves

If nothing is done, the body’s need for energy will become greater than its ability to produce that energy, and chronic stress may result. At this stage, insomnia, errors of judgment or personality changes may occur. The person could develop a serious illness, such as a heart condition, or become vulnerable to mental illness.

Specific Signs of Stress

– Sleep disorders (difficulty falling asleep, waking up and difficulty going back to sleep)

– feeling overwhelmed, unable to cope

– Changes in eating behavior

– Nervousness, anxiety, irritability or anger

– A feeling of frustration latent

– Feeling exhausted after a “normal” mental or intellectual effort

Types of Stress

Stress can be acute or chronic. Acute stress is by definition a peak of intense stress at a given moment while chronic stress is rather continuous over time.

Do you know what state of stress you are facing? Is it Acute, chronic, or both?

Acute stress

It results from an unusual situation or an unexpected event, destabilizing (divorce, oral presentation to an audience, period of examination, interview …). It is transient and the symptoms associated with acute stress disappear once the stressful situation is over. Occasionally, this stress can be beneficial for our system by allowing us to surpass ourselves and adapt to a threatening situation.

Chronic stress

It is prolonged and repeated. Chronic stress is part of everyday life because of its systematic appearance: it is the consequence of repeated and / or continuous exposure to sources of stress. The body is exhausted because it must constantly draw on its energy reserves to reduce stress.

Chronic stress is more dangerous for health, it causes persistent anxiety disorders and can lead to depression.

The best way to deal with Stress

To conclude, stress is not necessarily negative. If the stressful situation is quite brief, the stress can be positive because it allows adapting to a new context. If you manage your time and priorities well, you will be able to make stress a source of motivation and energy. The trick is to react and not to suffer the phenomenon while adapting to the situation.

DISCLAIMER:

The contents of this article are for informational purposes only. This is not professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your mental health professional or other qualified health providers with any questions you may have regarding your condition.

Test your Stress Level

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